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Join the South Sound GREEN Team!

South Sound GREEN Watershed Educator – Applications Due August 21, 2019 at 4:30 pm

Thurston Conservation District’s South Sound GREEN Program seeks a driven, creative educator with a passion for the natural world to support local teachers and students in water quality monitoring, habitat restoration and creating community connections leading to watershed protection. The South Sound GREEN Watershed Educator will serve in a well-established, place-based environmental education program housed at Thurston Conservation District. Through water quality sampling and data analysis, the Watershed Educator will split time between the classroom and field sites, often working outdoors at local Puget Sound beaches, marinas, wetlands, creeks, lakes and other outdoor learning environments. The Watershed Educator will engage students through water quality monitoring, nearshore experiences, restoration and other service learning projects, and through the Annual Student GREEN Congress where students will present and analyze data on more than 50 monitoring sites. They will assist teachers by increasing their skills and confidence with watershed education and assisting with teacher professional development opportunities.

See full job description & application instructions here.

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Climate Literacy and Monitoring in South Sound (CLAMSS)

Throughout the 2018-2019 school year, South Sound GREEN partnered with the Nisqually River Education Project to offer a series of workshops to area teachers focused on ocean acidification (OA). Teachers learned the basic chemistry behind OA, as well as some local monitoring efforts being conducted by NOAA, Pacific Shellfish Institute, Puget Sound regional tribes and more. The professional development culminated in field trips to Puget Sound beaches and marinas where students conducted their own studies to help them better understand the impacts of OA on subtidal and intertidal life.

Overall, 857 students visited Puget Sound as part of the CLAMSS program! South Sound GREEN staff coordinated with community partners to serve as station leaders including Pacific Shellfish Institute and beach naturalists from the Puget Sound Estuarium, and recruited and trained volunteer divers, biologists and community members interested in helping out. South Sound GREEN staff led a stations on water quality impacts on Puget Sound (utilizing the Enviroscape model as a tool to identify non-point source pollution impacts and ways kids can change their behavior to improve water quality), and on OA impacts to crab survival which included a quadrat study of the beach. 

Overall, SSG volunteers contributed 136.5 volunteer hours for these trips!  In addition, 82 volunteer chaperones attending with the schools contributed 323 volunteer hours for a combined 479.5 volunteer hours! Special thanks to NOAA’s B-WET Education Program for funding this program!

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27th Annual Student GREEN Congress!

On Thursday, March 21st over 350 local students will convene at The Evergreen State College to discuss water quality data across South Sound! In their morning State of the Rivers Sessions they will present the data from their water quality monitoring site and compare with others monitoring in the same watershed. Together they will decide on recommendations of action to improve watershed conditions!

Google Drive Site with South Sound GREEN presentations and maps: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/159xNX91JvKq5U7QVXirgImbePyTvpies

Google Drive Site with Nisqually River Education Project presentations and maps: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/1-cWSSfP4Ji4CNbP6fUAbQBqkLL9a-uP7

Environmental Education, Salmon, South Sound GREEN, Water Quality

Water testing in South Sound

IKPThis fall nearly 1200 students visited their local waterways to find out how healthy the water is for salmon.  With mostly sunny, dry days this fall, students fanned out across the Henderson, Deschutes, Eld and Totten Watersheds.  Overall, 57 sites were tested.  Student data showed better than optimal levels of dissolved oxygen in the Deschutes River, cold temperatures (all below 9 degrees C), and low turbidity.  Students will trek back out to their monitoring sites this February to once again collect and test the water, this time making observations on how increased rainfall might change their results.  Many thanks to the teachers and multiple parent and community volunteers who turned out to make this day a success!